Carrickfergus wood gets magical makeover

Carrickfergus wood gets magical makeover

A wood in Carrickfergus has received a makeover, adding a little mischievous magic for visitors to find.

Oakfield Glen was a countryman's residence built in the early 1800s and although the house no longer exists, the picturesque grounds remain.As part of the revamp, an old ice house has been restored to its former glory and magnificent specimen trees uncovered.Aside from rediscovering the woodland's longterm occupants, new inhabitants - the púca - have taken up residence at Oakfield Glen. The faery like creatures are hiding in the treetops through the wood and are waiting to be discovered.Púca, which is Irish for spirit, comes from ancient folklore. They are considered to bring people good or bad fortune and can change their appearance into that of an animal, usually black horses, goats or rabbits.Ten in total, the púca are actually steel sculptures, created by sculptors Alan Cargo and Eleanor Wheeler, with help from Acorn Integrated Primary and Oakfield Primary School.Michelle McCaughtry, the Woodland Trust's people engagement officer, said: "We are delighted to have the chance to show-off the recent additions to Oakfield Glen."It's the most beautiful old woodland, with a charming burn and Victorian stone bridge."The project, which was unveiled on Saturday, was made possible by grant-aid of £17,000 received by the Woodland Trust from the NGO Challenge Fund 2014.The Woodland Trust cares for over 1,000 woods in the UK, including 49 woods in Northern Ireland.The woods contain a mix of recently planted woodland, mature woodland and ancient woodland.The Woodland Trust has produced the first-ever comprehensive record of Northern Ireland's ancient woodland which can be accessed at www.backonthemap.org.uk

© UTV

Elsewhere on the Web

UTV Digest

Your daily digest of the most popular UTV Stories

Back to Top